Post Tagged with: "Stalin"

Karski and the Lords of Humanity
2016 Vol. 8 No. 2—Spring / Films

Karski and the Lords of Humanity

“Tell your people that they have a friend in the White House.” But the genocide continued, and in the end the friend gave Karski’s country to Stalin.

Potsdam and Poland
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Commentary

Potsdam and Poland

Loss of territory, no reparations from Germany, a dictatorship imposed from abroad, and no safe return for Polish veterans and wartime exiles. In Washington, London and Moscow power and duplicity ruled; honor and integrity collapsed. M.B.B. Biskupski comments.

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay

From Norway to Africa, from Russia to the Atlantic, in the air and on the sea, the Polish forces were there for their allies. Justine Jablonska pays tribute to the bravest and most loyal men and women of WWII.

Poland and the United Nations
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

Poland and the United Nations

Poland, a signatory of the Declaration of the United Nations in 1942, was excluded from the inaugural conference held in San Francisco in 1945. Piotr Długołęcki traces the diplomatic maneuvers that betrayed a faithful ally.

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children

They received gifts of dates, nuts, roasted peas with raisins, and juicy pomegranates; visited museums, mosques and bazaars; and were always greeted with kindness. All this in what has often been called the most beautiful city in the world.

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes

It is important to understand the welcome practices of host countries and their treatment of child refugees, and the long-term well-being and adaptation of both the children and their host countries. Amanda Chalupa takes a look at what is possibly the gold standard, set by the people of New Zealand.

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Commentary / Features

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption

When the Soviets deported Polish citizens from their zone of occupied Poland, the Poles began a journey that would cover several continents and oceans. Among the most amazing is the saga of the children’s odyssey.

The Indomitable Spirit of Halina Babinska: A Very Special Coming of Age Story
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

The Indomitable Spirit of Halina Babinska: A Very Special Coming of Age Story

Beautiful, wise, accomplished, serene and very strong, Halina Babinska is as admired as she is modest. She credits the sensitive care she got in the Polish orphanage after World War II for her recovery to a normal and useful life.

Chatting with Greg Archer
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Books / Interviews

Chatting with Greg Archer

Justine Jablonska catches Greg Archer in a serious moment, and the conversation ranges from Cyndi Lauper and Ewan McGregor to his indomitable family and the after-effects of war.

Greg Archer’s Grace Revealed
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Books

Greg Archer’s Grace Revealed

Fast-paced, sometimes self-indulgent but at times furiously funny, Greg Archer looks at his family’s traumatic experience in the Soviet gulag after years of running away from it.

Created by Stalin, Embraced by Emigrants? Mazowsze, Śląsk and the Polish Folk Dance Movement in America
2013 Vol. 5 No. 1 — Spring / Features

Created by Stalin, Embraced by Emigrants? Mazowsze, Śląsk and the Polish Folk Dance Movement in America

Mazowsze is arguably the most beautiful folk dance troupe in the world. Maja Trochimczyk poses the question: Does authenticity matter?

Polish Orphans of Tengeru: The Dramatic Story of Their Long Journey to Canada 1941-49
2010 Vol. 2 No. 2 — Summer / Books

Polish Orphans of Tengeru: The Dramatic Story of Their Long Journey to Canada 1941-49

Author Lynne Taylor documents the dramatic story of a group of Polish orphans who were exiled to Siberia, escaped via the Middle East, and grew up in Africa. They finally came to Canada – in defiance of claims by the communist regime that the children belong to them.