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2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall

Welcome to Fall 2015!

Welcome to autumn at Cosmopolitan Review! Our trumpets announce a long awaited film about Kościuszko; we review the highs and lows of a difficult era; and take a look at books old and new.

Potsdam and Poland
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Commentary

Potsdam and Poland

Loss of territory, no reparations from Germany, a dictatorship imposed from abroad, and no safe return for Polish veterans and wartime exiles. In Washington, London and Moscow power and duplicity ruled; honor and integrity collapsed. M.B.B. Biskupski comments.

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay

From Norway to Africa, from Russia to the Atlantic, in the air and on the sea, the Polish forces were there for their allies. Justine Jablonska pays tribute to the bravest and most loyal men and women of WWII.

Kościuszko: A Man Ahead of His Time
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Films

Kościuszko: A Man Ahead of His Time

There are more statues of Kościuszko in the United States than any other historical figure except George Washington. When Kościuszko talked about freedom, he meant it. So why don’t Americans know who he is? This documentary is a must for a national broadcast. PBS, take note.

The Ethnic and Religious Diversity of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth: Still Relevant Today?
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Books

The Ethnic and Religious Diversity of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth: Still Relevant Today?

Ethnic and religious diversity are now hot topics, something never tried before. Really? The Commonwealth warrants new attention. Thaddeus Gromada provides an introduction.

Poland and the United Nations
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

Poland and the United Nations

Poland, a signatory of the Declaration of the United Nations in 1942, was excluded from the inaugural conference held in San Francisco in 1945. Piotr Długołęcki traces the diplomatic maneuvers that betrayed a faithful ally.

The Piłsudski Institute Crosses the East River
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

The Piłsudski Institute Crosses the East River

Only Beth Holmgren can distill a history of an archive, an ethnic neighborhood, Poland and its not-so-faithful allies, and the Polish diaspora including pro bono architects, a credit union, and great food with so much information, affection and élan. And “sto lat” to the Institute’s director, Dr. Iwona Korga.

On the Eve of Freedom
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

On the Eve of Freedom

In a 1988 newscast, Stephanie Kraft heard the hejnał played from the tower of the Mariacki Church and learned that Poles had been doing so all through the communist era. Intrigued by these determined and stubborn people, she chose Poland as her destination for a journalist junket. She has returned every year since.

Chatting with B.E. Andre, “With Blood and Scars” Author
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Books / Interviews

Chatting with B.E. Andre, “With Blood and Scars” Author

Justine Jablonska talks to British journalist Bożena Andre about Andre’s new novel, With Blood and Scars, in which Andre takes on that very difficult challenge: combining the personal and the historical in one story. Not easy, when for so long the world refused to acknowledge the historical.

The Kingdom of Insignificance: Miron Białoszewski and the Quotidian, the Queer, and the Traumatic
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Books

The Kingdom of Insignificance: Miron Białoszewski and the Quotidian, the Queer, and the Traumatic

Białoszewski’s works subtly point to the alternative, marginalized, oftentimes unvoiced micro-narratives … showing readers different modes of knowledge and new ways of seeing history and identity. Diana Sacilowski reviews Joanna Niżyńska’s new book.

Taking Liberties: Gender, Transgressive Patriotism, and Polish Drama, 1786-1989
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Books

Taking Liberties: Gender, Transgressive Patriotism, and Polish Drama, 1786-1989

In Taking Liberties, Halina Filipowicz examines the portrayals of patriotism and identity of iconic heroes, from Kosciuszko to Plater and Wałęsa, in Polish drama from the 1600s to the present. Highly original, acutely observed study of loyalty and honor manipulated by triumphalism and xenophobia. Reviewed by Diana Sacilowski.

Emancipated Women
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Books

Emancipated Women

Poland’s 19th century novelist, Bolesław Prus, not only championed the emancipation of women but – thoroughly modern man that he was – identified the problem beyond manners and mores. It’s the economy, ladies! He was a pretty good storyteller too. Stephanie Kraft translates, Irene Tomaszewski reviews.

Bulletin Board Fall 2015
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board Fall 2015

The Africa-EU Partnership; “The Zookeeper’s Wife” home now a museum; two events on Miron Białoszewski in New York; and a concert at the Assembly Hall of Palais des Nations in Geneva in tribute to Polish pianist Artur Rubinstein.