Visit (or Re-Visit) our Past Issues

Welcome to our Spring 2015 issue!
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring

Welcome to our Spring 2015 issue!

Join the conversation about the quiet little film that took the noise capital of the world by storm, and about a startling opera that was long suppressed. Check out Silicon Valley and then gaze in awe at the sight of Poland’s little koniks, the descendants of the ancient Tarpans, as they are once again released into the wild. As always, cosmoPoles are everywhere (even the horses!), with great stories everywhere.

Mieczysław Weinberg’s Opera The Passenger: On Memory and Forgetting
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Music

Mieczysław Weinberg’s Opera The Passenger: On Memory and Forgetting

Mieczysław Weinberg’s opera, The Passenger, is not only a complicated work of art, but a complicated work of historical trauma. Magda Romanska reviews the work with a brilliant survey that covers the opera, the history, the novel by Zofia Posmysz, the film by Andrzej Munk, and the responses to the production.

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children

They received gifts of dates, nuts, roasted peas with raisins, and juicy pomegranates; visited museums, mosques and bazaars; and were always greeted with kindness. All this in what has often been called the most beautiful city in the world.

Hollywood Place Conversations: All About Ida
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Films

Hollywood Place Conversations: All About Ida

It’s a black-and-white film about a Polish Catholic nun that America didn’t ridicule but fell in love with. Agnieszka Niezgoda asks three members of the Academy, “Why?”

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes

It is important to understand the welcome practices of host countries and their treatment of child refugees, and the long-term well-being and adaptation of both the children and their host countries. Amanda Chalupa takes a look at what is possibly the gold standard, set by the people of New Zealand.

A World Apart
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Books

A World Apart

Gustav Herling-Grudziński, Inmate No. 1872, wrote his powerful indictment of the Soviet system of penal camps, the GULAG, not as a description of nations at war, but as a conflict between barbarism and civilization. First published in 1951, this book was quietly but intentionally suppressed for decades.

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Commentary / Features

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption

When the Soviets deported Polish citizens from their zone of occupied Poland, the Poles began a journey that would cover several continents and oceans. Among the most amazing is the saga of the children’s odyssey.

Poland: The First Thousand Years
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Books

Poland: The First Thousand Years

Patrice Dabrowski’s new history, written with her usual elegant style, refers to Poland with the pronoun “she” – but the Soviet-imposed regime as “it,” notes Nathan Wood, perhaps with a touch of disapproval. Now there’s a great discussion starter.

Helena Modjeska Art and Culture Club of Los Angeles: 43 Years of Business as Usual
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

Helena Modjeska Art and Culture Club of Los Angeles: 43 Years of Business as Usual

Too many for bridge, too few for an insurrection. The only option left was to have fun… at a very high cultural level, of course. Meet The Helena Modjeska Art and Culture Club of Los Angeles.

The Indomitable Spirit of Halina Babinska: A Very Special Coming of Age Story
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

The Indomitable Spirit of Halina Babinska: A Very Special Coming of Age Story

Beautiful, wise, accomplished, serene and very strong, Halina Babinska is as admired as she is modest. She credits the sensitive care she got in the Polish orphanage after World War II for her recovery to a normal and useful life.

Chatting with Greg Archer
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Books / Interviews

Chatting with Greg Archer

Justine Jablonska catches Greg Archer in a serious moment, and the conversation ranges from Cyndi Lauper and Ewan McGregor to his indomitable family and the after-effects of war.

Greg Archer’s Grace Revealed
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Books

Greg Archer’s Grace Revealed

Fast-paced, sometimes self-indulgent but at times furiously funny, Greg Archer looks at his family’s traumatic experience in the Soviet gulag after years of running away from it.

Rynek Underground
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Bulletin Board

Bulletin Board Spring 2015

Modjeska Monteith Simkins; Polin, Warsaw’s Museum of the History of Polish Jews; 11 Must-See Modern Museums in Poland; Sir Andrzej Panufnik; Mariusz Trelinski directs two operas at New York’s Met; the Witcher 3; and the centrality of Eastern European studies.

In Memoriam: Professor Anna Cienciala
2014 Vol. 6 No. 3 — Fall-Winter

In Memoriam: Professor Anna Cienciala

Professor Anna Cienciala, an internationally recognized authority on wartime relations in the 20th century, died on Christmas Eve, 2014. She was a gracious supporter of CR and also a speaker at the first Poland in the Rockies in 2004. We will miss her very much.

Welcome To Our 2014 Fall-Winter Issue!
2014 Vol. 6 No. 3 — Fall-Winter

Welcome To Our 2014 Fall-Winter Issue!

Wawel’s musicians are ready for a party. Poland has much to celebrate.

How the Cabaret Went to War
2014 Vol. 6 No. 3 — Fall-Winter / Features / Music

How the Cabaret Went to War

When Beth Holmgren writes about Poland’s interwar cabaret, you can almost hear the champagne corks flying. This time, the cabaret goes to war. Isn’t that when you need it most?

2014: The Year of Anniversaries
2014 Vol. 6 No. 3 — Fall-Winter / Features

2014: The Year of Anniversaries

It’s a big year for commemorations in Poland this year. We illuminate them with a photo essay, focusing mainly on the people behind the anniversary.