Post Tagged with: "WW2"

Jozef Jarosz, who saved 14 Jews during the Holocaust, meeting Jonny Daniels, left, in Warsaw in November 2016. (Photo courtesy of From the Depths)
2016 Vol. 8 No. 1—Winter / Commentary

The Polish Response to the Holocaust: A Discussion

CR takes this opportunity to publish a letter written by Eli Rubenstein, the Canadian Director of the March of the Living and an award-winning educator, to the JTA (Jewish Telegraph Agency) concerning its Dec. 11th article about Polish rescue efforts of Jews during WWII, followed by our own comments.

OJCU – To My Father
2016 Vol. 8 No. 1—Winter / Films

OJCU – To My Father

In 1938, a little girl, Alina Bandrowska, saw her father arrested by the NKVD, the Soviet secret police. He never returned.

The Ulma family
2016 Vol. 8 No. 2—Spring / Commentary

Beyond the Ulmas: The Need for a Social History of Genocide in Occupied Poland

Commemorations hold a special place in national memory; historians have an obligation to protect the emerging social history from being eclipsed. Tom Frydel explains.

Jan Karski
2016 Vol. 8 No. 2—Spring / Features

Jan Karski, Humanity’s Hero, a Soldier of an Allied Army

A special event in San Francisco honoured Jan Karski, and veterans of two allied countries, Poland and the United States. A great thing to do, especially together.

Black Ribbon Day
2016 Vol. 8 No. 2—Spring / Books

Black Ribbon Day

Why are Stalin’s alliance with Hitler and his genocidal policies overlooked, even denied? Reviewing Black Ribbon Day, Michał Kasprzak suggests “the nightmarish partnership of tyrannies” needs more attention.

Window to Freedom: A Journey of Survival
2016 Vol. 8 No. 2—Spring / Books

Window to Freedom: A Journey of Survival

It took Poland fifty years to regain its freedom. For many Poles it took even longer to liberate their memories. Marian Wiacek recorded his for his grandchildren.

The Warsaw Uprising: A Noncombatant Survivor’s Memoir
Books

The Warsaw Uprising: A Noncombatant Survivor’s Memoir

Miron Białoszewski’s memoir of the 63 days of terror endured by civilians during the Warsaw Uprising is a difficult but essential book. Kudos to NYRB for this new edition, translated by Madeline G. Levine.

Potsdam and Poland
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Commentary

Potsdam and Poland

Loss of territory, no reparations from Germany, a dictatorship imposed from abroad, and no safe return for Polish veterans and wartime exiles. In Washington, London and Moscow power and duplicity ruled; honor and integrity collapsed. M.B.B. Biskupski comments.

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay

From Norway to Africa, from Russia to the Atlantic, in the air and on the sea, the Polish forces were there for their allies. Justine Jablonska pays tribute to the bravest and most loyal men and women of WWII.

Chatting with B.E. Andre, “With Blood and Scars” Author
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Books / Interviews

Chatting with B.E. Andre, “With Blood and Scars” Author

Justine Jablonska talks to British journalist Bożena Andre about Andre’s new novel, With Blood and Scars, in which Andre takes on that very difficult challenge: combining the personal and the historical in one story. Not easy, when for so long the world refused to acknowledge the historical.

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children

They received gifts of dates, nuts, roasted peas with raisins, and juicy pomegranates; visited museums, mosques and bazaars; and were always greeted with kindness. All this in what has often been called the most beautiful city in the world.

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes

It is important to understand the welcome practices of host countries and their treatment of child refugees, and the long-term well-being and adaptation of both the children and their host countries. Amanda Chalupa takes a look at what is possibly the gold standard, set by the people of New Zealand.

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Commentary / Features

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption

When the Soviets deported Polish citizens from their zone of occupied Poland, the Poles began a journey that would cover several continents and oceans. Among the most amazing is the saga of the children’s odyssey.