Post Tagged with: "World War II"

The Ulma family
2016 Vol. 8 No. 2 - Spring / Commentary

Beyond the Ulmas: The Need for a Social History of Genocide in Occupied Poland

Commemorations hold a special place in national memory; historians have an obligation to protect the emerging social history from being eclipsed. Tom Frydel explains.

Generals Sikorski & Anders in Iran, 31 km to Tehran, 4371 to Warsaw
2016 Vol. 8 No. 1 - Winter / Books

Trail of Hope: The Anders Army, an Odyssey Across Three Continents

This is a war story that unites the fate of soldiers and civilians. Thank you, Norman Davies, for gathering the memoirs, the photographs, and the historian’s details, and telling the story with such élan. Now where’s the young historian who will break new ground and write a scholarly work on this neglected subject?

The Warsaw Uprising: A Noncombatant Survivor’s Memoir
2016 Vol. 8 No. 1 - Winter / Books

The Warsaw Uprising: A Noncombatant Survivor’s Memoir

Miron Białoszewski’s memoir of the 63 days of terror endured by civilians during the Warsaw Uprising is a difficult but essential book. Kudos to NYRB for this new edition, translated by Madeline G. Levine.

Remembrance, Commemoration, Education, and Celebrating Life
2016 Vol. 8 No. 1 - Winter / Books

Remembrance, Commemoration, Education, and Celebrating Life

The Canadian segment of the March of the Living and the March of Remembrance and Hope, under the direction of Eli Rubenstein, commemorates, educates and celebrates life with love and respect for all people in our troubled world.

The Polish Underground and the Jews, 1939-1945
2016 Vol. 8 No. 1 - Winter / Books

The Polish Underground and the Jews, 1939-1945

Joshua Zimmerman’s groundbreaking book carries out “two fundamental tasks of the historian: restoring the buried sense of historical contingency and recognizing the human proportion of experiences still painfully fresh.” Tom Frydel reviews.

Potsdam and Poland
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Commentary

Potsdam and Poland

Loss of territory, no reparations from Germany, a dictatorship imposed from abroad, and no safe return for Polish veterans and wartime exiles. In Washington, London and Moscow power and duplicity ruled; honor and integrity collapsed. M.B.B. Biskupski comments.

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay
2015 Vol. 7 No. 3 — Fall / Features

Poland As An Ally: WWII Photo Essay

From Norway to Africa, from Russia to the Atlantic, in the air and on the sea, the Polish forces were there for their allies. Justine Jablonska pays tribute to the bravest and most loyal men and women of WWII.

Exhibit: From War to Victory, 1939-1989
2015 Vol. 7 No. 2 — Summer / Interviews

Exhibit: From War to Victory, 1939-1989

“When enemies agree to sit at the table, push away anger and desire for revenge, they find a way to compromise,” IPN historian Przemysław Gasztold-Seń tells Bobbie Traut. Democracy is always a work in progress, and Gasztold-Seń remains optimistic.

Mieczysław Weinberg’s Opera The Passenger: On Memory and Forgetting
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Music

Mieczysław Weinberg’s Opera The Passenger: On Memory and Forgetting

Mieczysław Weinberg’s opera, The Passenger, is not only a complicated work of art, but a complicated work of historical trauma. Magda Romanska reviews the work with a brilliant survey that covers the opera, the history, the novel by Zofia Posmysz, the film by Andrzej Munk, and the responses to the production.

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

Isfahan, the City of Polish Children

They received gifts of dates, nuts, roasted peas with raisins, and juicy pomegranates; visited museums, mosques and bazaars; and were always greeted with kindness. All this in what has often been called the most beautiful city in the world.

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

New Zealand: The Warmest of Welcomes

It is important to understand the welcome practices of host countries and their treatment of child refugees, and the long-term well-being and adaptation of both the children and their host countries. Amanda Chalupa takes a look at what is possibly the gold standard, set by the people of New Zealand.

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Commentary / Features

February 1940: Exile, Odyssey, Redemption

When the Soviets deported Polish citizens from their zone of occupied Poland, the Poles began a journey that would cover several continents and oceans. Among the most amazing is the saga of the children’s odyssey.

The Indomitable Spirit of Halina Babinska: A Very Special Coming of Age Story
2015 Vol. 7 No. 1 — Spring / Features

The Indomitable Spirit of Halina Babinska: A Very Special Coming of Age Story

Beautiful, wise, accomplished, serene and very strong, Halina Babinska is as admired as she is modest. She credits the sensitive care she got in the Polish orphanage after World War II for her recovery to a normal and useful life.